AITF 2017 Annual Conference October 26 & 27, 2017

AGENDA

 

October 26

Marriott Eastside, 525 Lexington Avenue (at 49th Street), New York, NY


5:00 p.m.   Registration
5:30 – 8:00 p.m.   Opening Reception (Whitney Room)

 

October 27

Marriott Eastside, 525 Lexington Avenue (at 49th Street), New York, NY

 

All Plenary Sessions will take place in Morgan A-C
 

7:45 a.m.    Registration

8:15 a.m.    Welcome from the AITF’s Chair

8:20 a.m.    Director's Report, Goals for the Day and Overview of the Agenda

8:30 a.m.    Opening Keynote Plenary

9:20 a.m.    Break

9:30 a.m.    Panel on Education

10:50 a.m.  Panel on Economic Development

Special Briefing on AITF Economic Development Subgroup

12:10 p.m.  Luncheon Plenary– Government and Anchor Institutions-Community Partnerships 

1:20 p.m.    Panel on Health Anchors and Strategies to Improve Community Health

Special Briefing on AITF Health Professionals Subgroup

2:40 p.m.    Break

2:50 p.m.    Breakout Groups on Education, Economic Development, Health, and Government: What are your reflections on what you have heard today? What are the implications for the AITF's policy, research, and advocacy going forward?

3:35 p.m.    Highlights from Groups

3:45 p.m.    Closing Remarks and AITF Next Steps

3:55 p.m.    Adjourn

4:00 p.m.    Closing Reception (Morgan Ballroom foyer until 6pm)

2015

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2014

Presentations

 

2013

Highlights

AITF ANNUAL CONFERENCE

November 10 & 11, 2016

AGENDA

Register

Speaker Bios

Journal on Anchor Institutions and Communities

Conference Slides

 

November 10

 

Marriott Eastside, 525 Lexington Avenue (at 49th Street), New York, NY


5:00 p.m.   Registration
5:30 p.m.   Opening Reception (Whitney Room)
8:00 p.m.   Adjourn

 

November 11

 

Marriott Eastside, 525 Lexington Avenue (at 49th Street), New York, NY

All Plenary Sessions will take place in Morgan A-C

7:45 a.m.    Registration

MC: David Maurrasse, President, Marga Incorporated and Director, AITF

8:15 a.m.    Welcome from the AITF’s Chair: Ira Harkavy, Director, Netter Center for Community Partnerships, University of Pennsylvania and Chair, AITF

8:20 a.m.    Director's Report, Goals for the Day and Overview of the Agenda: David Maurrasse, President, Marga Incorporated and Director, AITF

8:30 a.m.    Opening Keynote Plenary:

  • Earl Lewis, President, Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

9:20 a.m.    Break

9:30 a.m.    Panel on Education:

  • ModeratorJohn Christensen, Chancellor, University of Nebraska-Omaha
  • Richard Guarasci, President, Wagner College
  • Phoebe Haddon, Chancellor, Rutgers University-Camden
  • Jay Perman, President, University of Maryland-Baltimore
  • Wanda Ward (By Video), Assistant Director for Broadening Participation, Office of Science and Technology Policy, The White House

10:50 a.m.  Panel on Economic Development:

  • ModeratorIrma Becerra, Provost and Chief Academic Officer, St. Thomas University
  • Jasmine Thomas, Senior Vice President, National Initiatives, Citi Community Development
  • Xavier Briggs, Vice President, Economic Opportunity and Markets, Ford Foundation
  • Paul Pribbenow, President, Augsburg College and Chair, Central Corridor Anchor Partnership (CCAP) and Laura Beeth, System Director, Talent Acquisition, Fairview Health Services, Member Board of Directors, CCAP

Special Briefing on AITF Economic Development Subgroup:  Emily Gresham, Assistant Vice President Research, Office of Research and Economic Development, Florida International University

12:10 p.m.  Luncheon Plenary– Government and Anchor Institutions-Community Partnerships:

  • Jeff Hornstein, Director of Financial and Policy Analysis, Philadelphia City Controller
  • Tanisha Jumper, Manager, Tacoma 2025, City Manager’s Office, City of Tacoma and India Adams, Senior Management Fellow, Community and Economic Development, City of Tacoma

1:20 p.m.    Panel on Health Anchors and Strategies to Improve Community Health:

  • ModeratorBrenda Battle, Vice President, Care Delivery Innovation, Urban Health Initiative & Chief Diversity and Inclusion Officer, The University of Chicago Medicine and Biological Sciences
  • Jaime Dircksen, Director, Community Health Institute, Trinity Health 
  • Tyler Norris, Vice President, Total Health Partnerships, Kaiser Permanente
  • David Perlstein, President & CEO, SBH Health System; Scott Cooper, Former CEO, SBH Health Systems, and Ron Moelis, CEO, L and M Development Partners

Special Briefing on AITF Health Professionals Subgroup: Diane Jones, Vice President, Healthy Communities, Catholic Health Initiatives

2:40 p.m.    Break

2:50 p.m.    Breakout Groups on Education, Economic Development, Health, and Government: What are your reflections on what you have heard today? What are the implications for the AITF's policy, research, and advocacy going forward?

  • Education (Astor I): Byron P. White, Vice President for University Engagement and Chief Diversity Officer, Cleveland State University
  • Economic Development (Astor II): Marika Reuling, Chief of Staff, Office of the Executive Vice President, Harvard University
  • Health (O’Keefe): Faith Bynoe, Senior Associate, Marga Incorporated
  • Government (Morgan): Teya Dalton, Senior Associate, Marga Incorporated

3:35 p.m.    Highlights from Groups: Ira Harkavy, Director, Netter Center for Community Partnerships, University of Pennsylvania and Chair, AITF

3:45 p.m.    Closing Remarks and AITF Next Steps: David Maurrasse, President, Marga Incorporated and Director, AITF

3:55 p.m.    Adjourn 

4:00 p.m.    Closing Reception (Morgan Ballroom foyer until 6pm)

 

The AITF thanks supporters: The Ford Foundation, The New World Foundation, The Surdna Foundation, Citi Community Development

 

2017 Annual Conference: October 26 and 27 in New York City 

The Prosperity Foundation (TPF) is an emerging philanthropic and educational initiative designed to strengthen Connecticut’s Black/African American communities in critical areas such as health, education, and economic development.

2015 AITF Annual Conference Information

Agenda

Speakers' Bios

Presentations

AITF 2015 Annual Conference

Speakers' Bios

AITF Home

October 29-30, 2015

AGENDA

October 29

New York Marriott East Side
Lexington Avenue, New York, NY

5:00 p.m.   Registration

5:30 p.m.   Opening Reception (Whitney Room)

7:30 p.m.   Adjourn

 

October 30

New York Marriott East Side
Lexington Avenue, New York, NY

All Plenary Sessions will take place in Morgan A-C

7:45 a.m.    Registration

MC: David Maurrasse, President, Marga Incorporated and Director, AITF

8:15 a.m.    Welcome from the AITF’s Chair: Ira Harkavy, Director, Netter Center for Community Partnerships, University of Pennsylvania and Chair, AITF

8:20 a.m.    Director's Report, Goals for the Day and Overview of the Agenda: David Maurrasse, President, Marga Incorporated and Director, AITF

8:30 a.m.    Opening Keynote Plenary:

  • Anthony Marx, President, New York Public Library

9:20 a.m.    Break

9:30 a.m.    Panel on Education:

  • Moderator: Paul Pribbenow, President, Augsburg College;
  • Ronald Berkman, President, Cleveland State University
  • Olivene Burke, Executive Director, Mona Social Services, University of the West Indies
  • Nancy Cantor, Chancellor, Rutgers University-Newark;
  • Mildred Garcia, President, California State University Fullerton;

10:50 a.m.  Panel on Economic Development:

  • Moderator: Patricia Swann, Senior Program Officer, Community Development and the Environment, New York Community Trust
  • Melvyn Colon, Executive Director, Southside Institutions Neighborhood Alliance
  • Tony Gallagher, Pro-Vice Chancellor, Queens University Belfast
  • Irwin Lowenstein, President, ReThink Advisors, Inc.
  • Michael Rao, President, Virginia Commonwealth University
  • Ommeed Sathe, Vice President, Impact Investments, Prudential Financial

 

Special Briefing on AITF Economic Development Subgroup: Tony Sorrentino, Executive Director, Office of the Executive Vice President, University of Pennsylvania

 

12:10 p.m.  Luncheon Panel – Arts Institutions and Place Making:

  • Thelma Golden, Director and Chief Curator, The Studio Museum in Harlem

1:20 p.m.    Panel on Health Anchors and Strategies to Improve Community Health:

  • Moderator: Jay Perman, President, University of Maryland, Baltimore
  • Debbie Chang, Enterprise Vice President, Policy and Prevention, Nemours Children’s Health System
  • Pedro Greer, Associate Dean for Community Engagement, Professor and Chair Department of Medicine, Family Medicine and Community Health, Florida International University
  • Diane Jones, Vice President of Healthy Communities, Catholic Health Initiatives
  • Kimberlydawn Wisdom, Senior Vice President, Community Health and Equity, Henry Ford Health System

2:40 p.m.    Break

2:50 p.m.    Breakout Groups on Education, Economic Development, Health, and Arts Institutions: What are your reflections on what you have heard today? What are the implications for the AITF's policy, research, and advocacy going forward?

  • Education (Astor I): Richard Guarasci, President, Wagner College 
  • Economic Development (Astor II): Roland Anglin, Senior Advisor, Rutgers University- Newark
  • Health (O'Keefe): Terri Lipman, Assistant Dean, University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing
  • Arts Institutions (Morgan): Leonard Velasquez, Senior Associate, Marga Incorporated

3:35 p.m.    Highlights from Groups: Ira Harkavy, Director, Netter Center for Community Partnerships, University of Pennsylvania and Chair, AITF

3:45 p.m.    Closing Remarks and AITF Next Steps: David Maurrasse, President, Marga Incorporated and Director, AITF

3:55 p.m.    Adjourn

4:00 p.m.    Closing Reception (Morgan Ballroom foyer until 6pm)

The AITF thanks supporters: The Carnegie Corporation, The Ford Foundation, The New World Foundation, The Surdna Foundation, and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

AITF Annual Conference
November 17-18, 2014

 

AGENDA


November 17

Opening Reception

 

November 18

Location: Gleacher Center of the University of Chicago, 450 North Cityfront Plaza Drive, Chicago, IL


7:45 a.m.    Registration

MC: David Maurrasse, President, Marga Incorporated and Director, AITF

8:15 a.m.    Welcome from the AITF’s Chair: Ira Harkavy, Director, Netter Center for Community Partnerships, University of Pennsylvania and Chair, AITF

8:20 a.m.     Welcome from the University of Chicago: Derek Douglas, Vice President for Civic Engagement, University of Chicago

8:25 a.m.    Director's Report, Goals for the Day and Overview of the Agenda: David Maurrasse, President, Marga Incorporated and Director, AITF

8:35 a.m.    Opening Keynote Plenary: Terry Mazany, President, Chicago Community Trust; Robert Zimmer, President, University of Chicago (Presentation Part 1 | Part 2)

9:25 a.m.    Break

9:35 a.m.    Panel on Education (Presentations): 

  • Moderator: Nancy Cantor, Chancellor, Rutgers University-Newark;
  • John Christensen, Chancellor, University of Nebraska-Omaha;
  • Shayne Evans, CEO/Director, University of Chicago Charter School;
  • Elson Nash, Team Lead, Promise Neighborhoods and Full Service Community Schools, U.S. Department of Education

10:50 a.m.  Panel on Economic Development (Presentations): 

  • Moderator: Henry Louis Taylor, Professor, Urban and Regional Planning, University of Buffalo
  • Elizabeth Sobel Blum, Senior Community Development Advisor, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas
  • Anthony Sorrentino, Executive Director, Office of the Executive Vice President, University of Pennsylvania
  • Julia Stasch, Interim President, MacArthur Foundation
  • Kinnard Wright, Grants Specialist, Office of University Partnerships, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development

12:20 p.m.  Lunch and International Anchors Panel (Presentation): 

  • Ahmed C. Bawa, Vice-Chancellor and Principal, Durban University of Technology;
  • Heather Campbell, Professor, Office of the Vice Chancellor, University of Sheffield

1:20 p.m.   Remarks from the White House on the Affordable Care Act: Heather Foster, Public Engagement Advisor, White House Office of Public Engagement

1:25 p.m.    Panel on Health Anchors and Strategies to Improve Community Health (Presentations):

  • Moderator: Dwayne Proctor, Director, Eliminating Health Disparities Portfolio, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
  • Gerald Clancy, President, University of Oklahoma-Tulsa
  • Matt Enstice, President & CEO, Buffalo-Niagara Medical Campus
  • Doriane Miller, Associate Professor of Medicine, the University of Chicago Department of Medicine

2:40 p.m.    Break

2:50 p.m.    Breakout Groups: What are your reflections on what you have heard today? What are the implications for the AITF's policy, research, and advocacy going forward? 

Group Moderators:

  • Education: Richard Guarasci, President, Wagner College
  • Economic Development: Ted Howard, Executive Director, Democracy Collaborative
  • Health: David Perry, Professor Urban Planning and Policy, University of Illinois at Chicago
  • International: Renee T. White, Dean, College of Arts and Sciences, Simmons College

3:35 p.m.    Highlights from Groups: Ira Harkavy, Director, Netter Center for Community Partnerships, University of Pennsylvania and Chair, AITF

3:45 p.m.    Closing Remarks and AITF Next Steps: David Maurrasse, President, Marga Incorporated and Director, AITF

3:55 p.m.    Adjourn

4:00 p.m.    Closing Reception

Speaker Bios

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AITF Member Affiliations

"I Have a Dream" Foundation
30,000 Degrees
79th Police Precinct Community Council
AAKT Concepts
AASCU-The Democracy Commitment
Allston Brighton Community Development Corporation
Alvernia University
American Association of Medical Colleges
American Bar Association
American Communities Trust
Annie E Casey Foundation
Archeworks
Argonne National Laboratory
Associated Black Charities
Association of American Colleges and Universities
Association of Baltimore Area Grantmakers
Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities
Atlanta University Center Consortium
Augsburg College
Avenue of the Arts, Inc.
Baltimore City Public Schools
Baltimore Community Foundation
Baltimore Museum of Art
Baltimore Neighborhood Collaborative
Bard College
Berea College
Bethel New Life, Inc.
Bishop Arthur M. Brazier Foundation
Boston College 
Boys & Girls Clubs of America
BRicK Partners
Brophy & Reilly, LLC 
Brown University
BrownHall Group
Buffalo Niagara Medical Campus
Buffalo State, The State University of New York
California State University Fullerton
California State University Monterrey Bay
California State University, Sacramento
Campaign for the Civic Missions of Schools
Campus Compact
Campus Compact for New Hampshire
Campus Compact of the Mountain West
Cardinale Associates LLC
Carson-Newman University
Case Western Reserve University
Catalyst Miami
Catholic Charities Brooklyn and Queens
CCBQ
Center for Leadership, Development and Advocacy, Inc.
Central Baltimore Partnership
C'est Si Bon,ltd
Charles North Community Association
CHI/KentuckyOne Health
Chicago Community Trust
Chicago Harris
Chicago Housing Authority
Chicago Housing Authority Resident Board
Chicago Jobs Council
Citi
Cities of Service
City Council
City First Enterprises
City of Baltimore
City of Chicago
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City of Philadelphia
City of Providence, Office of Mayor Angel Taveras
City of Tacoma
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Civic Consulting Alliance
Clark University
Cleveland Clinic
Cleveland Foundation
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Coalition of Urban and Metropolitan Universities
College of Staten Island, The City University of New York
Columbia College Chicago
Columbia Law School 
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Community & Economic Development
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Community Foundation for Greater Atlanta
Community Foundation for Southeast Michigan
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Comptroller of the Currency
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Council of Europe
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Democracy Collaborative
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East Baltimore Development, Inc.
Edgewood College
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Emerging Leaders in Science & Society
Emory University
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Fairfax County Office of Public Private Partnerships
Fairview Health Services
Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas
Flint and Genesee Chamber of Commerce
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Form Based Codes Institute
FW Consultants, LLC
Gensler
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IFF
independent consulant
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Initiative for a Competitive Inner City
Institute for Educational Leadership
Institute for Work and the Economy
Interise
Iris Ade / Coldwell Banker
iSER Consulting
Jackqueline N. Miller, Ed. D
Jackson Park Action Council
Jackson State University
Jessie Ball duPont Fund
Job Opportunities Task Force
Johns Hopkins Carey Business School
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Joseph and Harvey Meyerhoff Family Charitable Funds
JPAC, Hyde Park CAC
Kaiser Permanente
Kapi'olani Community College, U. Hawaii
Keswick MultiCare
King College Prep
Kingsborough Community College 
Knowledge Empowerment
KP Advisors
KPW Partners/ KPW Foundation
L+ M Development Partners
La Rabida Children's Hospital
Legacy Foundation
Lehigh University
Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University
Local Enterprise Assistance Fund (LEAF)
Loretto Hospital
Loyola University Chicago
Loyola University of Maryland
MAC Properties - Antheus Capital
MacArthur Foundation
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New York City Economic Development Corporation
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PlusUltre LLC
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RainbowPUSH
Reedus-Swope Media Group
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Regions Hospital
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SBH Health System
SDHC
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SINA
Smith Partners PLLP
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The America21 Project Inc.
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The Democracy Collaborative
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The Silver Parker Group
The University of Chicago
The University of Chicago School of Social Service Administration
The University of Manchester
The University of Memphis
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The Urban Institute
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The White House
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Triangle North Healthcare Foundation
Trinity Health
TRTCHC
Tulane University
UI LABS
United South Broadway Corporation
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United States Environmental Protection Agency
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United Way of Greater Cleveland
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University of Cape Town
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University of Connecticut
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University of Dayton
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University of Iowa
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University of Southern California
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University of Sydney
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University of Texas at El Paso
University of Texas-Pan American
University of the Pacific
University of the West Indies, Mona
University of Toronto
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Urban Affairs Coalition
Vedder Price PC
Virginia Commonwealth University
W A L K Studio
Wagner College
Wagner College School of Nursing/Maimonides Medical Center Division of Geriatrics
Wash Cycle Laundry
Washington University in St. Louis
Wayne State University
Wells Fargo Bank, N.A.
Wesleyan University
Western Kentucky University
Wheaton College
Whelley Consulting
White House Council on Strong Cities, Strong Communities (SC2)
White House Domestic Policy Council
Widener University
William Paterson University
Winona State University
Wisconsin Campus Compact
WMCHealth Network
WMCHealth PPS
Woodlawn Community Development Corporation
Woodlawn Neighbors Assn
World Business Chicago
Young Audiences New York

Highlights from the 2013 Annual Conference

 

Overall Summary of the Conference (please click)

 

Presentations

Anchors and Economic Development

Anchors and Health

AITF 2013 Literature Review

NEW!  2013 Literature Review

Anchor Institutions: An Interpretive Review Essay assesses the growing body of research and writing on anchor institutions.  As rooted institutions in their localities, anchor institutions have emerged as important stabilizing forces and change agents.  Increased interest in leveraging anchor institutions to strengthen neighborhoods, towns, cities, and regions has spawned a rapidly growing body of literature on the idea, role, and future of anchor institutions.

The AITF commissioned a literature review to improve understanding of the state of knowledge in the field.  The authors of the review, Professor Henry Louis Taylor of the University of Buffalo and his colleague Gavin Luter, address a number of themes that have been central to discussions and writings on anchor institutions, including the origin and definition of the concept, as well as the social responsibility of anchors institutions to their surroundings.

Close to 250 articles and books on anchor institutions published   during the last two decades are cited in the review.  Anchor Institutions: An Interpretive Review Essay not only presents, discusses, and analyzes important ideas, but it also provides suggestions for future research and writing and challenges the field to increase its understanding and more effectively involve anchor institutions in community development and improvement.

To read the Literature Review, click here


 

AITF Publications

Not Taking Democracy for Granted: Higher Education, Inclusion, and Community Trust by Nanncy Cantor, June 26, 2014

Diversity and Higher Education: Our Communities Needs More Than "Narrowly Tailored" Solutions by Nancy Cantor

Strategic Public Private Partnerships by David Maurrasse *NEW BOOK*

Exploring Innovations in Public Private Partnerships by David Maurrasse

Mega Sporting Events Can Bring Improvement by David Maurrasse

2013 AITF Literature Review

Journal of Higher Education, Outreach and Engagement 2013 AITF Edition

Anchor Institutions Task Force 2013 Literature Review

Cooperating Across the Atlantic: Helping Realize Higher Education's Democratic Mission, by Sjur Bergan and Ira Harkavy

Anchor Institutions,  by U.S. Department of Housing and Development

Recent Speech by AITF Chair, Ira Harkavy

Democratic Devolution: How America's Colleges and Universities Can Strengthen Their Communities by Rita Axelroth Hodges and Ira Harkavy

The Road Half Traveled: University Engagement at a Crossroads, new book by Rita Axelroth Hodges and Steve Dubb

"What should Universities Do for Their Cities?" Zócalo Public Square, Responses by Nancy Cantor and Ira Harkavy among others

"It's Graduation Time-- So What Do We Want from Universities?" Huffington Post (May 26, 2011) by Nancy Cantor

The Promise and Prospects of Anchor Institutions: some thoughts on an emerging field" HUD  PD&R Edge (June 22, 2011) by Charles Rutheiser

Introductory Remarks at the  Reimagining Democratic Societies  Conference (June 27, 2011) by Ira Harkavy

The Civic Learning and Democratic Engagement (CLDE) Action Network

Building on the momentum generated by the 2012 White House release of A Crucible Moment: College Learning and Democracy’s Future, the CLDE Action Network, convened by AAC&U, includes the following thirteen leading civic learning organizations that are collaborating to promote the National Call to Action at the center of the report.  Each organization is uniquely positioned to advance distinct pieces of the ambitious civic agenda, and strategic collective action by the Action Network promises to maximize the overall impact of their efforts.  In a word, the group aims to make civic ethos, inquiry, literacy, and collective action an expected outcome of every student’s college education.  Developing reciprocal, generative partnerships between higher education and its community partners is a major recommendation in A Crucible Moment.
·         American Association of State Colleges and Universities
·         Anchor Institutions Task Force
·         Association of American Colleges and Universities
·         The Bonner Foundation
·         Bringing Theory to Practice
·         Campus Compact
·         Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning and Engagement
·         The Democracy Commitment: A Community College Initiative
·         Imagining America
·         The Interfaith Youth Core
·         Kettering Foundation
·         NASPA: Student Affairs Administrators in Higher Education
·         New England Resource Center for Higher Education

For more information on A Crucible Moment: College Learning and Democracy’s Future, see http://www.aacu.org/civic_learning/crucible/index.cfm where the report can be purchased in hard copy or viewed and downloaded as a PDF file.

Democracy Collaborative

Since 1999, The Democracy Collaborative has worked to build the deep knowledge, theoretical analysis, practical tools, network of relationships and innovative models representing a new paradigm of economic development in the United States. The hallmarks of this approach include refocusing public and private resources to expand individual and family assets, broaden ownership over capital, and restore community banks and economic institutions. In so doing, we aim to return wealth to communities and end generational poverty, create quality jobs with family-supporting wages, stabilize communities and their environment, and address our nation’s growing wealth inequality.

Our research, strategy and policy website—http://www.Community-Wealth.org—is updated regularly and is a comprehensive source for information about the community wealth building movement nationwide. The Collaborative is also recognized nationally as a primary architect of the Evergreen Cooperative Initiative in Cleveland, Ohio, a comprehensive community building and economic development strategy designed to transform Cleveland’s Greater University Circle by breaking down barriers between the area’s anchor institutions and the City's low-income neighborhoods

Founded in 1989, the Coalition of Urban and Metropolitan Universities (CUMU) is an organization comprised of private and public universities, 4-year and community colleges, and large research and liberal arts focused higher education institutions. CUMU members share a commitment to serving the communities they reside in through teaching, research, and service; they are anchors in their metropolitan areas. These universities see the power in partnerships for achieving institutional and city-wide strategic goals.

CUMU proudly publishes the triennial journal – Metropolitan Universities. Each themed issue of Metropolitan Universities reports in-depth on critical issues and trends impacting higher education, their partners, and the communities they serve. Articles are contributed by top scholars and administrations who bring diverse perspectives to the table. To learn more about the Coalition, Metropolitan Universities, and their programs, please visit http://cumuonline.org

Campus Compact

Campus Compact is a national coalition of almost 1,200 college and university presidents who are committed to fulfilling the public purposes of higher education. As the only national higher education association dedicated solely to campus-based civic engagement, Campus Compact promotes public and community service that develops students’ citizenship skills, helps forge effective community/campus partnerships, and provides resources and training for faculty seeking to integrate civic and community-based learning into the curriculum. Campus Compact’s membership includes public, private, two- and four-year institutions across the spectrum of higher education. For more information, visit www.compact.org

Campus Compact
Coalition of Urban and Metropolitan Universities
Democracy Collaborative
The Civic Learning and Democratic Engagement (CLDE) Action Network
 

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Private

Online Resource Page

Currently, the AITF has well over 400 members from about 250 institutions.  Many important initiatives to strengthen the role of anchor institutions in community and economic development are represented in the AITF's membership. The Online Resource Table showcases some of these efforts. Please let us know if you would like your work to be included  by emailing aitf@margainc.com.

 

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REPG Spring 2013 Newsletter

"The Evolution of Race and Equity in W.K. Kellogg Foundation's Practices and Policies" Webinar September 2012

"Engaging Donors in Light of Changing Demographics" Panel at the COF 2012 Fall Conference

Recoloring the Community Foundation Landscape

Newsletter Spring 2012

Newsletter Fall 2011

September 2012 REPG Webinar

During this session, we discussed the W. K. Kellogg Foundation's evolution and approaches to policies and practices with regard to race and equity. Presenters from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation included:

* Dr. Gail Christopher, Vice President of Program Strategy
* Luz Benitez-Delgado, Deputy Director
* Kathy Reincke, Communications Officer
* Joel Wittenberg, Vice President & Chief Investment Officer

The REPG is a peer-learning and mutually reinforcing network identifying and informing foundation policies and practices on matters of race and equity. Together and as individual organizations they are committed to improving their ability to effectively promote race and equity in their policies, operations and practices. Some of the REPG's pressing goals are to identify and inform foundation policies and procedures on matters of race and equity, increase dialogue across organizations, research and document efforts to guide the field, and produce tools and resources that enable replication. Current members include The San Francisco Foundation, The California Endowment, California Community Foundation, The Annie E. Casey Foundation, the Woods Fund of Chicago, the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, and the Winthrop Rockefeller Foundation, and is facilitated by Marga Inc.

Webinar slides are available:
REPG Introduction to Webinar
W.K. Kellogg Foundation Presentation

For more information on the Race and Equity in Philanthropy Group, follow us on twitter @raceandequity.

Members Area:
Anyone with an interest in building, creating or improving mutually beneficial anchor institution-community partnerships is welcomed to become a member.  This free membership allows you to virtually connect and interact with others colleagues in the United States and around the world. 

You Can:
• Find key persons with similar interests or the expertise you need-- members can create a  personal profile and view other member profiles
• Discuss important news and topics on topic postings
• Share opinions and reflections on crucial issues affecting cross-sector partnerships
• Learn what is happening among anchor institutions nationally and world wide

Becoming a part of this network is as easy as two simple steps: Become a member and Sign up for the online forum

2013 REPG Annual Report

REPG Newsletter Spring 2013

REPG Newsletter Spring/Summer 2012

REPG Newsletter Fall 2011

Anchor Institutions Forum December 15, 2011

 

                                          

                                          

Advancing the Quality of Life, Learning and Civic Development through Anchor Institution-School-Community Partnerships

Join the Task Force

Meeting Synopsis

Hosted by the Anchor Institutions Task Force

and

the Campaign for the Civic Mission of Schools


December 15, 2011

Meeting Location:
University of Pennsylvania
Houston Hall
3417 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104

Themes:

  • Civic mission can lead to comprehensive community development through strengthening schools and families
  • Breaking down barriers between K-12 and higher education
  • Promoting civic learning and community engagement

 

Agenda:

9:00 a.m.   Registration and Continental Breakfast, Bodek Lounge, Houston Hall, 1st Floor

 

10:00 a.m.    Welcome and Agenda Overview

  • Ira Harkavy, Associate Vice President and Director  of the Netter Center for Community Partnerships, University of Pennsylvania and Anchor Institutions Task Force, Chair

10:10 a.m.   Updates on the Anchor Institutions Task Force and the Campaign for the Civic Mission of Schools

  • David Maurrasse, President and Founder, Marga Incorporated and Anchor Institutions Task Force, Director
  • Ted McConnell, Executive Director, Campaign for the Civic Mission of Schools 


10:30 a.m.   Anchor Institutions and the Civic Mission of Schools: National and Global Perspectives

  • Moderator: Maureen Curley, Campus Compact, President
  • Sjur Bergan, Council of Europe, Directorate of Democratic Citizenship and Participation, Education Department, Head
  • Michelle Herczog, National Council for the Social Studies, Board of Directors Member; California Campaign for the Civic Mission of Schools, Co-Leader; and Los Angeles County Office of Education, History-Social Science Consultant
  • Eduardo Padrón, Miami Dade College, President
  • Larkin Tackett, U.S. Department of Education, Director of Place Based Initiatives

11:30  a.m.   Table Discussions

  • What are the core issues (policy, funding, etc.) facing the civic mission of schools?
  • What are the best vehicles (policy, funding, etc.) to advance anchor institutions-school partnerships, locally, regionally, and nationally?
  • What will it take for practices on the ground to have maximum impact?

12:15 p.m.  Lunch, Bodek Lounge, 1st Floor

  • Lee Fisher, CEOs for Cities, President and CEO

12:45 p.m.   Anchors and the Civic Mission of Schools: Exemplary Practice from the Field, Bodek Lounge, 1st Floor

  • Moderator: Carol Schneider, Association of American Colleges and Universities, President
  • Gerald Clancy, University of Oklahoma- Tulsa, President
  • Douglas Dobson, University of Central Florida, Executive Director of the Lou Frey Institute of Politics and Government
  • Richard Guarasci, Wagner College, President
  • Wendell Pritchett, Rutgers University, Camden, Chancellor

1:45 p.m. Breakout Groups/Strategic Planning

  • How can the Task Force and the Civic Mission of Schools work more closely to advance their common missions?
  • What are the specific opportunities to work together around research and policy?


The above questions to be discussed in four subgroups:

  • AITF Research Committee, Ben Franklin Room, 3rd Floor
  • AITF Policy Committee, Golkin Room , 2nd Floor
  • AITF and CMS Collaboration, Grisky, 3rd Floor
  • Media – Developing a Proactive Media Strategy Locally and Nationally, Bodek Lounge, 1st Floor

2:45 p.m.    Breakout Group Report Back, Bodek Lounge, 1st Floor

 

3:15 p.m.    Next Steps

  • Ira Harkavy
  • David Maurrasse
  • Ted McConnell

4:00 p.m.    Adjourn

Join the Task Force

Defining a Committed Foundation – the W.K. Kellogg Foundation

(full length article)



As the REPG set out to influence deep foundation-wide commitments to racial equity, inclusion, and diversity in its emphasis on policies and practices, member foundations have been working to establish the benchmarks for a committed foundation.  If we are encouraging deeper commitments, what are the characteristics of foundations that demonstrate a genuine sense of responsibility to reducing racial disparities and setting examples around diversity and inclusion?  What does it take to get there institutionally?  What are the most important and catalytic considerations when a foundation decides to deepen its commitment?  How can foundations express their commitments in all facets of their institutions?

During the Chicago meeting, the W.K. Kellogg Foundation reported on its comprehensive progress.  Indeed, many of us now know of Kellogg’s grant making around racial healing, through its substantial America Healing initiative,  with over three hundred grantees across the U.S.
Fewer may know of the extent of Kellogg’s emerging commitment.  First of all, America Healing is intended to be a permanent commitment; it is not a grant program with a deadline.  The effort is inherently integrated into Kellogg’s core mission and vision.  America Healing is not intended to exist in a box or bubble within the foundation, but to pervade each division.  The initiative is becoming well known, due in part to a deliberate communications strategy.

(continue reading)


Kellogg has been highly visible through magazines and debates and videos to highlight the relevance of strategies to address racial disparities and racism, and the important role of philanthropy therein.

Organizationally, Kellogg has made headway in areas that have eluded many foundations, even those who have expressed the desire to change.  For example, Kellogg has included businesses owned by persons of color among its investment firms.    Kellogg diversified its investment officers.  Kellogg’s auditing firm is owned by a person of color as well.  Across the foundation, staffing has diversified by thirty six percent.  Overall, not only has the Foundation addressed its staffing demographics, but it has been able to make strides in the ever elusive area of purchasing. Kellogg is measuring its grantee and vendor demographics.

Kellogg continues to review the wide range of ways in which they can enhance their institutional commitment.  On the whole, this comprehensive approach has not merely come to fruition smoothly.  However, its presence and continuation can be linked to leadership.  Kellogg’s diverse Board of Trustees established the Foundation’s commitment to becoming a premier “anti-racist” foundation.  The priorities were instituted at the highest level of decision making.  Kellogg VP, Gail Christopher’s extraordinary leadership carried through a multi-dimensional approach buoyed by a substantial grant program, America Healing, which brought new resources to communities to strengthen the space for dialogue and problem solving around the seemingly impenetrable and deeply ingrained features of racism in structures and civil society.

Christopher, who has been sitting at the REPG table since she arrived at Kellogg, has been able to rely on REPG for knowledge, guidance, and support as Kellogg continues to pave its pathway.  As we continue to wonder what a committed foundation looks like, and what it takes to get there, the Kellogg experience is certainly poised as an exceptional resource to the entire philanthropic field.  Kellogg deserves a great deal of credit for not only courageously building a model, but sharing it.


 

 

 

(Return to Newsletter)

Local Learning Exchanges

(full length article)


On June 23, 2011 in Chicago, the REPG initiated a new feature designed to establish mutual learning between REPG members and local area funders and local ones around race, diversity, and inclusion in philanthropy.  In this spirit, REPG member, Woods  Fund for Chicago, hosted a dinner dialogue that engaged a number of representatives of Chicago foundations in information exchanges with REPG members.  Local representatives spanned Chicago’s rich philanthropic field.  In addition to the Woods Fund, the Chicago Foundation for Women, the Crossroads Fund, the Wieboldt Foundation, the Lloyd Fry Foundation, and others collectively buzzed with anticipation to get a better sense of national progress toward a more diverse and inclusive philanthropic field.

On this rainy and surprisingly chilly early evening, the long conference table at the Woods Fund’s new headquarters quickly filled.  Local foundation representatives and the out-of-towners from the REPG were eager to meet and learn from each other.  Attendees were briefed on REPG’s status, progress, and direction.  They received an update on the D5.  And, the Kellogg Foundation discussed its progress with America Healing.

(continue reading)

The Kellogg story in particular raised a number of questions and enthusiastic responses, as it provided a specific example of a foundation altering its many dimensions around racial equity, inclusion, and diversity.  In general, attendees want to know what it takes to institutionally transform foundations.  But Chicago foundations have also been engaged in their own attempts to influence policies and practices to support new principles.  All in attendance were happy to learn of each other’s efforts, as awareness of similar efforts across the country has been increased just a bit more through this dinner discussion.  Isolation among those in philanthropy pushing for greater commitment by their foundations has been reduced some more as well.

With two Woods Fund trustees in attendance and the notable role of Kellogg’s board in setting the tone and paving the way toward an “anti-racist” agenda, the significance of leadership became a lively point of conversation.  The perspectives of trustees are critical to consider in any attempt to bring about true systemic change in foundations.  This reality was so palpable in this dialogue that REPG is going to more deliberately emphasize strategies to engage trustees around their role and potential.  In fact, REPG will begin inviting trustees to its meetings as a result of this Chicago dinner.  Also resulting from this dinner is a new tradition – REPG will hold similar dinner discussions wherever it holds its in person meetings from now on.  REPG remains especially grateful to Consuella Brown, Acting President of the Woods Fund, and REPG member for generously and graciously organizing and hosting a successful and catalytic event.

 

(Return to Newsletter)

The Evolution

(full length article)

Welcome to the inaugural issue of REPG News.  The REPG (Race and Equity in Philanthropy Group) promotes policies and practices to encourage philanthropic institutions to strengthen their commitments to communities of color and reducing racial and ethnic disparities.  The REPG was created due to disproportionately adverse conditions facing communities of color in the areas of most concern to the philanthropic field – poverty, health, education, and on.  In 2002, the Annie E. Casey Foundation commissioned Marga Incorporated to study the ways in which foundations have been addressing matters of race, diversity, and inclusion in all aspects internally and externally, from the composition of leadership to the demographics of grantees and vendors to the priorities of strategic plans to accountability measures and evaluation systems to data collection, and on.

Throughout this research, which engaged thirty foundations across the U.S., various participants in the study requested greater opportunities for ongoing learning between and among foundations.  Consequently, Casey and Marga organized focus group discussions.  Participants in these conversations requested an ongoing safe space through which foundation representatives could learn from each other through peer exchanges.  Casey and Marga acted accordingly, and created what ultimately came to be known and the Race and Equity in Philanthropy Group in 2006.

(continue reading)

The REPG emphasized improving systems and operations in order to institutionalize commitments to racial equity, diversity, and inclusion.  Conversations about deepening foundations’ sense of responsibility to communities of color have persisted throughout the last few decades.  As veterans in philanthropy, the original REPG members (Annie E. Casey Foundation, the Rockefeller Foundation, the California Endowment, the Haas Jr. Fund, the San Francisco Foundation) emphasized widespread change in foundation policies and practices beyond grant programs.

Foundation representatives at the REPG table often play the role of individual champions inside of their foundations, sometimes moving against the tide to encourage change.  The REPG table brings peer learning as well as peer support, reducing isolation.  REPG representatives can bring new ideas and concrete examples of practices back to their foundations, making their institutions aware of the precedent being established in the philanthropic field.  REPG reports, Profiles in Giving to Communities of Color capture some of the advances of member foundations in institutionalizing their commitments.

REPG members can point to new practices and policies in their foundations that have been influenced or aided by their REPG peers.  For example, REPG member foundations have been making collective strides in collecting demographic data to establish baselines against which progress in giving by demographic categories can be measured consistently.  REPG, as it has established its core methods and demonstrated progress among members, is breaking new ground, with an eye toward engaging a larger number of foundations, yet maintaining the intimacy and impact of its learning exchange approach with a core group of members.  The membership composition has shifted over the years.  Now REPG includes a cluster of veteran members, such as the Annie E. Casey Foundation, The California Endowment, the San Francisco Foundation, and the W.K. Kellogg Foundations, alongside newer members bringing different types of philanthropic experiences and perspectives, such as the Andrus Family Foundation, the Winthrop Rockefeller Foundation, and the Woods Fund for Chicago.

You will hear more about REPG in the coming months and years, as REPG meetings have added new dimensions such as this new letter and local outreach in cities hosting REPG in person meetings, which take place three times per year.

 

(Return to Newsletter)

Race and Equity in Philanthropy Group

 

                                                   September 2011

 

The Evolution

Welcome to the inaugural issue of REPG News.  The REPG (Race and Equity in Philanthropy Group) promotes policies and practices to encourage philanthropic institutions to strengthen their commitments to communities of color and reducing racial and ethnic disparities.  The REPG was created due to disproportionately adverse conditions facing communities of color in the areas of most concern to the philanthropic field – poverty, health, education, and on.  In 2002, the Annie E. Casey Foundation commissioned Marga Incorporated to study the ways in which foundations have been addressing matters of race, diversity, and inclusion in all aspects internally and externally, from the composition of leadership to the demographics of grantees and vendors to the priorities of strategic plans to accountability measures and evaluation systems to data collection, and on.

Throughout this research, which engaged thirty foundations across the U.S., various participants in the study requested greater opportunities for ongoing learning between and among foundations.  Consequently, Casey and Marga organized focus group discussions.  Participants in these conversations requested an ongoing safe space through which foundation representatives could learn from each other through peer exchanges.  Casey and Marga acted accordingly, and created what ultimately came to be known and the Race and Equity in Philanthropy Group in 2006...continue reading

Local Learning Exchanges

On June 23, 2011 in Chicago, the REPG initiated a new feature designed to establish mutual learning between REPG members and local area funders and local ones around race, diversity, and inclusion in philanthropy.  In this spirit, REPG member, Woods  Fund for Chicago, hosted a dinner dialogue that engaged a number of representatives of Chicago foundations in information exchanges with REPG members.  Local representatives spanned Chicago’s rich philanthropic field.  In addition to the Woods Fund, the Chicago Foundation for Women, the Crossroads Fund, the Wieboldt Foundation, the Lloyd Fry Foundation, and others collectively buzzed with anticipation to get a better sense of national progress toward a more diverse and inclusive philanthropic field.

On this rainy and surprisingly chilly early evening, the long conference table at the Woods Fund’s new headquarters quickly filled.  Local foundation representatives and the out-of-towners from the REPG were eager to meet and learn from each other.  Attendees were briefed on REPG’s status, progress, and direction.  They received an update on the D5.  And, the Kellogg Foundation discussed its progress with America Healing...continue reading

 

Defining a Committed Foundation – the W.K. Kellogg Foundation

As the REPG set out to influence deep foundation-wide commitments to racial equity, inclusion, and diversity in its emphasis on policies and practices, member foundations have been working to establish the benchmarks for a committed foundation.  If we are encouraging deeper commitments, what are the characteristics of foundations that demonstrate a genuine sense of responsibility to reducing racial disparities and setting examples around diversity and inclusion?  What does it take to get there institutionally?  What are the most important and catalytic considerations when a foundation decides to deepen its commitment?  How can foundations express their commitments in all facets of their institutions?

During the Chicago meeting, the W.K. Kellogg Foundation reported on its comprehensive progress.  Indeed, many of us now know of Kellogg’s grant making around racial healing, through its substantial America  Healing initiative,  with over three hundred grantees across the U.S.
Fewer may know of the extent of Kellogg’s emerging commitment.  First of all, America Healing is intended to be a permanent commitment; it is not a grant program with a deadline.  The effort is inherently integrated into Kellogg’s core mission and vision.  America Healing is not intended to exist in a box or bubble within the foundation, but to pervade each division.  The initiative is becoming well known, due in part to a deliberate communications strategy....continue reading

Coming to a Region Near You...
Our first regional dinner took place on June 23rd in Chicago, IL.  Local foundations discussed the unintended consequences of a lack of diversity and engaged REPG members about their stories and experiences.  Discussion elevated issues such as the need to engage leadership, the next generation and each other. Riding on the energy of the Chicago learning exchange dinner, the REPG is moving ahead with a new tradition to engage local foundation representatives in cities where we are meeting.  In October, the REPG will be in the Bay Area of California, where the California Endowment and the San Francisco Foundation will host a local philanthropic learning exchange dinner.  These REPG members will invite philanthropic representatives across the West Coast and in Hawaii to participate in this event.  During the late winter of 2012, the REPG will visit the South, likely Little Rock Arkansas.  Baltimore will come next at some point later in 2012.
 

 

AITF

 

CHAIR:

Ira Harkavy, University of Pennsylvania, Associate Vice President and Director of the Netter Center for Community Partnerships

FACILITATOR:

Marga Incorporated
                           

STEERING COMMITTEE:


Eugenie L. Birch, University of Pennsylvania, Lawrence C. Nussdorf Professor of Urban Research, Chair of the Graduate Group in City & Regional Planning, Founding Co-Director of the Penn Institute for Urban Research
Nancy Cantor, Syracuse University, Chancellor
Henry Cisneros, CityView, Executive Chairman
David N. Cox, University of Memphis, Executive Assistant to the President for Partnerships and Administration
Richard Guarasci, Wagner College, President
Ira Harkavy, University of Pennsylvania, Associate Vice President and Director  of the Netter Center for Community Partnerships
James T. Harris III, Widener University, President
Ted Howard, University of Maryland, Founding Executive Director of The Democracy Collaborative
David Maurrasse, Marga Incorporated, President and Founder
Eduardo J. Padrón, Miami Dade College, President
David C. Perry, University of Illinois at Chicago, Professor and Director of the Great Cities Institute and Associate Chancellor for the  Great Cities Commitment
Beverly Daniel Tatum, Spelman College, President
Henry Taylor, University at Buffalo, Professor, Department of Urban and Regional Planning
Nancy Zimpher, State University of New York, Chancellor


POLICY COMMITTEE CO-CHAIRS:

Martin J. Blank, Institute for Educational Leadership, President and Director of the Coalition for Community Schools
Nancy Cantor, Syracuse University, Chancellor
David N. Cox, University of Memphis, Executive Assistant to the President / Professor Urban administration, politics, and problems; community building

RESEARCH COMMITTEE CO-CHAIRS

Eugenie L. Birch, University of Pennsylvania, Lawrence C. Nussdorf Professor of Urban Research, Chair of the Graduate Group in City & Regional Planning, Founding Co-Director of the Penn Institute for Urban Research
David C. Perry, University of Illinois at Chicago, Professor and Director of the Great Cities Institute and Associate Chancellor for the  Great Cities Commitment
Henry Taylor, University at Buffalo, Professor, Department of Urban and Regional Planning

                                                                                                                                                                                                                             

What We Do    Management and Administration    Evolution    Become a Member    Leadership
 

Our work as a whole transcends issue areas as creating better communities requires attention on many factors ranging from health and mental health to employment to housing and on. We categorize our work in four broad categories:

healing

Diversity and Racial & Ethnic Inclusion

 

   As a $300 billion plus industry, private philanthropy has been  relatively able to fly under political radar screens over recent decades.  More recently, large private foundations have been questioned around the distribution of their resources.  In recent years, political debate has raged on around the need to broaden the spread of philanthropic dollars to communities of color.

The idea of diversity in philanthropy has also been widely discussed with respect to the composition of foundation leaders and boards, along with the demographics of vendors.  The corporate sector has long developed diversity strategies from marketing to various demographic groups to supplier diversity programs to human resource attempts to vary the composition of staff.  Diversity strategies and benchmarks have been relatively common in some companies and industries.  However, philanthropy has been working to "catch-up" in this respect.

 

REPG
Profiles Reports
• News

Strategic Partnerships & Anchor Institutions

Marga’s experience in advising anchor institution partnerships increased our understanding of what it  takes to forge and sustain effective collaborative initiatives.  These emerging lessons informed the development of Marga’s method, which identifies the central considerations of an outside advisor in being helpful to partnerships.  These lessons informed Marga’s role as a partnership catalyst an outside party responsible for guiding the development of multi-stakeholder partnerships. The idea that customized advice to such partnerships can bring value is far more commonplace now than when we honed the idea some years ago.

The essence of Marga’s role as a supportive partner to the field advancing the civic potential of anchor institutions is expressed in our coordination of the Anchor Institutions Task Force.  Chaired by the University of Pennsylvania, this partnership of institutional leaders and advocates has forged a national voice backed by a critical mass of influential stakeholders who have traditionally promoted mutually beneficial partnerships between anchor institutions and their surrounding communities.

AITF
Real Partnerships Report
• News

Civic Engagement & Education

The progress of youth from primary to secondary to postsecondary  education and beyond remains an area of critical concern.  In a highly technological, knowledge-oriented stage in the global arena, opportunities for young people are increasingly governed by success along an educational pathway.  We have witnessed significant disparities among different demographic groups of young people with respect to their success and advancement in education.  We know the earnings of those who have completed at least a bachelor’s degree vastly outpace those who have not.  America’s global competitiveness depends upon educational advancement on a mass scale, particularly in science and math.

Early childhood education and socioeconomic status usually define the nature of a child’s progression along a pathway.  Movement across educational segments is cumulative.  Success in early grades often positions young people for greater access and success in the long run.  Access to higher education has been a major concern in philanthropic, nonprofit, and policy circles.  However, postsecondary completion has emerged as a central concern.

COIN
• Civic Pathways out of Poverty
• News

Established and Emerging Philanthropy

As the nature of our work was refined in philanthropy, private foundations have been actively involved.  Concepts around the role of higher education in society, expressed in Beyond the Campus,  and advisory services designed to strengthen the catalytic potential of private giving were continually shaped through working relationships with the Rockefeller Foundation, the Annie E. Casey Foundation, the Open Society Institute, and others.  Marga’s first few significant contracts enabled the company to not only provide a scope of services for particular projects, but to begin building a body of work.

The research, strategic advice, writing, assessment, and program development Marga has provided to foundations over the years has taken various forms and influences a number of sustained efforts.  As Marga’s engagement with private foundations deepened, our expertise  in philanthropic advisory services materialized, leading to our growing effort to advise smaller scale emerging philanthropists.  Our experiences in enhancing foundations’ competency around changing demographics and persistent inequalities based on race or ethnicity emerged from pursuits with quite a few foundations, such as the Annie E. Casey Foundation, the Atlantic Philanthropies, the California Endowment, the San Francisco Foundation, the Greater New Haven Foundation, the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, and others.

 

COIN (Civic Opportunities Initiative Network)

COIN Curriculum Components

  • Summer Learning –Educational activity when regular schooling is not in session, which enhances cognitive development and provides opportunities for civic engagement
  • Leadership Training –A process challenging individuals to interact with others and take responsibility for individual or group goals, which increases confidence, self efficacy, capacity to serve others, and group decision making
  • Coaching–Ongoing encouragement and guidance for participants, including mentoring that increases academic, personal, and social youth development
  • Cohort Movement –The selection of students into a group of peers that develop, work, and progress through stages of the program together

 

How it Works          COIN Conceptual Framework          COIN Curriculum Components       

  More Information

COIN (Civic Opportunities Initiative Network)

COIN Conceptual Framework

  • Promise–The COIN Promise guarantees a reward for satisfactory achievement
  • Service–Students work with community organizers to address critical issues
  • Power and Value of Community –Community offers stability and meaning, reflected through CBOs.
  • Participation and Youth Leadership –Values-based learning and experience strengthens commitment to communities and civic engagement
  • Social and Emotional Learning(SEL) enables COIN elements work together effectively

 

How it Works          COIN Conceptual Framework          COIN Curriculum Components       

  More Information

COIN (Civic Opportunities Initiative Network)

How it Works

Youth enter a CBO leadership pipeline and assist community organizing while receiving:

◦Internships
◦Academic guidance
◦Leadership development
◦Mentoring
◦Education in organizing
◦Postsecondary education
◦Jobs in community organizing

 

How it Works          COIN Conceptual Framework          COIN Curriculum Components      

   More Information

Race and Equity in Philanthropy Group

Publications

Recoloring the Community Foundation Landscape (2012)

Profiles in Foundation Giving 1 (2007)

Profiles in Foundation Giving 2 (2008)

REPG Lessons Learned (2009)

Race, Culture, Power and Inclusion in Foundations (2006)

 

REPG Approach          A Brief History          Publications

Follow the REPG @raceandequity

Race and Equity in Philanthropy Group

History and Evolution

In 2002, the Annie E. Casey Foundation commissioned Marga Incorporated (then called DJM & Associates) to scan a range of practices in philanthropy with respect to race, ethnicity and various forms of diversity.  Approximately thirty foundations of all types were engaged one on one for this study.  Results of this research were ultimately captured in the 2005 report, Race, Culture, Power, and Inclusion in Foundations: A Report Conducted for the Annie E. Casey Foundation.  As the interviews in preparation for this report progressed, a desire for peer exchanges among foundation representatives emerged.  Subsequently, the research incorporated focus groups and panels that further heightened interest in ongoing exchanges of ideas and practices among foundations.  A subset of participants in the study began to meet to create a vehicle through which peer communication to inform and enhance practice regularly.


This initial group included the Annie E. Casey Foundation, along with the San Francisco Foundation, the California Endowment, the Haas, Jr. Fund, and the Rockefeller Foundation.  Marga Incorporated organized and moderated these conversations, extending from the role that naturally evolved via the Annie E. Casey Foundation – sponsored research.  While the initial research took a very broad view of race, ethnicity, and diversity in philanthropy, including grant making and institutional practice, the body that ultimately became the REPG honed its focus with a particular emphasis on race and ethnicity and on the systemic internal practices that can enhance a foundation’s capacity to remain relevant and serve increasingly diverse communities.  It has been clear to REPG member foundations that the most critical social concerns that philanthropy tends to pursue bring racial dimensions.  The greatest challenges around health, education, economics, the environment, and other critical areas tend to be manifested most adversely in communities of color.  If philanthropy is to maximize its value in these important arenas, it must improve its ability to understand and reflect communities of color.  This requires identifying grantee demographics, measuring progress by demographics, establishing plans to impact these demographics, diversifying leadership, and engaging organizations and companies led by and serving communities of color in ways that far exceed traditional expectations and practices.


As it solidified and became official in 2006, the REPG added the W.K. Kellogg Foundation and the Atlantic Philanthropies.  Each member foundation established a three year work plan outlining ambitions to transform and/or enhance internal systems to improve impact in communities of color.  Each foundation enters REPG from a different starting point.  Work plans are thus accordingly varied.  Progress toward these intentions is periodically demonstrated in reports distributed at the Council on Foundations’ annual conferences.  Two such reports, Profiles in Foundation Giving to Communities of Color Volumes I and II, have been distributed. 


Foundation representatives in REPG have been those who have been champions – voices continually encouraging greater internal attention to the centrality of race and ethnicity to the core mission and purpose of these institutions, even in the face of opposition.  Such champions are situated in various positions in foundations, often leading from the middle.  Even when they are perched at the top of foundations, institutional change requires many players, occurrences, and collective internal buy-in.  The REPG is defining and refining what it takes to re-examine and reform how foundations take responsibility for reducing racial and ethnic disparities and improving race relations.

To learn more about the Race and Equity in Philanthropy Group, please contact: repg@margainc.com.

 

REPG Approach          A Brief History          Publications

Follow the REPG @raceandequity

Race and Equity in Philanthropy Group

REPG Approach


Through learning exchanges and individual technical assistance, REPG identifies various issues to address, ranging from ways to diversify foundation leadership to how to stimulate economic development in communities of color through purchasing, and others.

Given the numerous and overlapping concerns that arise in the assessment of grant making impact on communities of color and the level of conversation in the field about these issues, the Group decided that this type of assessment was an appropriate initial issue.

  • Do foundations actually and systematically measure and gather data around the racial and ethnic demographics of grantees and       grantee communities? If so, how are communities and grantees defined?
  • What constitutes an organization of color?
  • How does a foundation set benchmarks around funding to organizations of color?
  • Even if a foundation measures its contributions to organizations defined as representative of communities of color, how can one    measure the impact of those dollars on the actual communities of color?

Foundations come in all shapes and sizes; therefore, how these questions are addressed varies.

The REPG also prepares papers capturing its findings and presenting recommendations that can be useful to the philanthropic industry as a whole. It continually addresses different dimensions of race and equity in philanthropy and reports on its progress in various key conferences, websites, and periodicals in the philanthropic industry.

 

 

REPG Approach          A Brief History          Publications     Follow the REPG @raceandequity

AITF

Become a Member

 

Reg

More About the Task Force:

What We Do    Management and Administration    Evolution    Become a Member   Leadership
 

Relevant Documents:

Task Force Statement    Retooling HUD Executive Summary    Retooling HUD Chapter 8

AITF

Evolution of the Task Force

The Task Force is led initially by the University of Pennsylvania and administered by Marga Incorporated.

Founded in 1992, the Netter Center is Penn’s primary vehicle for bringing to bear the broad range of human knowledge needed to solve the complex, comprehensive, and interconnected problems of the American city so that West Philadelphia (Penn’s local geographic community), Philadelphia, the University itself, and society benefit. Throughout this time, Marga has provided ongoing support for the Task Force, by helping align the agendas of those in higher education advocating for expanded engagement, the new Federal Administration, and philanthropy.

The Netter Center is based on three core propositions:

  • Penn’s future and the future of West Philadelphia/Philadelphia are intertwined.
  • Penn can make a significant contribution to improving the quality of life in West Philadelphia/Philadelphia.
  • Penn can enhance its overall mission of advancing and transmitting knowledge by helping to improve the quality of life in West    Philadelphia/Philadelphia.

The Netter Center, which is housed in the Office of Government and Community Affairs, works to achieve the following objectives:

  • Improve the internal coordination and collaboration of all university-wide community service programs
  • Create new and effective partnerships between the University and the community
  • Create and strengthen local, national and international networks of institutions of higher education committed to engagement with their local communities

Through the Netter Center, the University currently engages in three types of activities: academically based community service, direct traditional service, and community development. Academically based community service is at the core of the Center’s work. It is service rooted in and intrinsically linked to teaching and/or research, and encompasses problem-oriented research and teaching, as well as service learning emphasizing student and faculty reflection on the service experience. Approximately one hundred sixty courses (from a wide range of disciplines and Penn schools) link Penn students to work in the community. (A steady increase in the number of academically based community service has occurred since 1992 when only eleven such courses were offered.)

For more information on the Netter Center, click here.

More About the Task Force:

What We Do    Management and Administration    Evolution    Become a Member   Leadership
 

Relevant Documents:

Task Force Statement    Retooling HUD Executive Summary    Retooling HUD Chapter 8

AITF

Task Force Management and Administration

The Task Force is led initially by the University of Pennsylvania and administered by Marga Incorporated.

The University of Pennsylvania’s experiences in recent decades provide a persuasive case as to how an anchor institution can comprehensively contribute to a neighborhood and city, by tapping its intellectual, social, economic, human, and physical capital to transform its environment. Numerous lessons have been drawn from this story in the form of the Anchor Institutions Toolkit (Netter Center, 2009), which provides a useful guide for anchor institutions on how to simultaneously strengthen their purpose and surroundings and the results of a Penn-sponsored national conference, "Urban Anchors in the 21st Century: A Commitment to Place, Growth and Community" (October 2007). The Penn Institute for Urban Research, co-directed by Eugenie Birch and Susan Wachter, coordinated the development and publication of a series of task force reports titled Retooling HUD for a Catalytic Federal Government: A Report to Secretary Shaun Donovan, which included the "Anchor Institutions" report. Eugenie Birch was also the co-chair on the "Anchor Institutions Task Force" report. The Director of Penn’s Netter Center for Community Partnerships, Ira Harkavy, is the chair of the Task Force. Marga Incorporated is a consulting firm dedicated to strengthening partnerships and philanthropic initiatives through research and strategic guidance.

More About the Task Force:

What We Do    Management and Administration    Evolution    Become a Member    Leadership

Relevant Documents:

Task Force Statement    Retooling HUD Executive Summary    Retooling HUD Chapter 8

 

AITF

What We Do

Engaging government and philanthropy, the Task Force is enhancing anchor institution practices by:

  • Bringing together scholars, university presidents and other leaders in higher education, and practitioners;
  • Increasing cooperation and alignment among government, anchor institutions, businesses, schools, community organizations and philanthropy;
  • Developing strategies to promote interagency government collaboration;
  • Providing tools for anchor institutions to enhance their societal missions, address local needs, as well as strengthen democratic, mutually beneficial partnerships between institutions of higher education, schools, and community based organizations;
  • Providing tools for anchor institutions to help students develop as democratic citizens who are lifelong contributors to communities and the nation’s well-being.
  • Complementing philanthropic strategies to support and strengthen vulnerable communities.

 

More About the Task Force:

What We Do    Management and Administration    Evolution    Become a Member    Leadership
 

Relevant Documents:

Task Force Statement    Retooling HUD Executive Summary    Retooling HUD Chapter 8

Race and Equity in Philanthropy Group

Sign Up for the REPG Learning Community

 

2013 REPG Annual Report

 

Overview

The Race and Equity in Philanthropy Group (REPG) brings together foundations committed to improving their ability to effectively promote racial equity in their operations and practices.  It is an active resource for specific practices in philanthropy covering issues around measurement, results, networks, evaluations, and measurable impact in communities. For these foundations, involvement in the REPG demonstrates a desire to get better.

REPG provides an opportunity for member foundations to improve their own approaches to race and inclusion through peer learning. Each member foundation outlines a work plan that captures what it will take in order to develop or refine the systems that can enhance the capacity to operate in a diverse society and increase impact, especially in communities of color.  Each member foundation comes to the REPG from a different starting point.  Therefore, work plans are necessarily varied. 

Member foundations bring ideas and practices from peers into their respective efforts, raising the overall bar of how philanthropic institutions strategically consider systemic alterations designed to combat inequality.  Any foundation hoping to increase responsiveness to communities of color, planning to highlight racial and ethnic equity in practices, seeking to improve internal communication around race, or intending to diversify its own internal demographics and external partners could find value in the REPG.

 

REPG Approach          A Brief History         Publications     Resources   Newsletters

 

                                          

              

                                                                                                                                 

 

 

Follow the REPG @raceandequity

Anchor Institutions Task Force (AITF)

AITF 2017 Annual Conference: October 26-27, 2017, New York City 

Anchor Institutions Task Force Literature Review

AITF Economic Development Subgroup Metrics Template

 

The Anchor Institutions Task Force (AITF) is a growing network of over 700 leaders promoting the engagement of anchor institutions—including colleges, universities, hospitals, community foundations, libraries, arts institutions, and other anchors—in community and economic development.  The AITF is designed to develop and disseminate knowledge and function as an advocacy and movement building organization to create and advance democratic, mutually beneficial anchor institution-community partnerships.

Anchor institutions are enduring organizations that are rooted in their localities.  It is difficult for them to leave their surroundings even in the midst of substantial capital flight.  The challenge to a growing movement is to encourage these stable local assets to harness their resources in order to address critical issues such as education, economic opportunity, and health.  It is difficult to imagine fragile local economies and widening social disparities changing without leveraging stable institutions, especially amidst a decline in government resources. These dynamics have given rise to the concept “anchors” as agents of community and economic development.

Since 2009, the AITF has hosted annual conferences, produced several publications, created professional development affinity groups, and established international partnerships.

AITF is an individual membership organization.   Individuals can join if they agree with the AITF’s principles and values. The general membership is free of charge.

Core values of the Anchor Institutions Task Force include:

  • Collaboration and Partnership
  • Equity and Social Justice
  • Democracy and Democratic Practice
  • Commitment to Place and Community

Background

In winter 2008-2009, a national task force was convened to advise the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) on how HUD could increase its impact and strategically leverage anchor institutions, particularly higher education and medical institutions (“eds and meds”), to improve communities and help solve significant urban problems.

The anchor task force’s report, “Anchor Institutions as Partners in Building Successful Communities and Local Economies,” was published, by the Penn Institute for Urban Research, along with nine other reports in a volume titled Retooling HUD for a Catalytic Federal Government: A Report to Secretary Shaun Donovan (2009). Soon after the report's publication, the ad hoc task force became a formal organization, the Anchor Institutions Task Force (AITF).  

 

More About the Task Force:

What We Do    Management and Administration    Evolution    Become a Member   Leadership

Publications

Relevant Documents:

Task Force Statement    Retooling HUD Executive Summary    Retooling HUD Chapter 8     AITF Member Affiliations    

Past AITF Conferences     2013 Literature Review

Thoughtful Pieces by Task Force Members:

Mega Sporting Events Can Bring Improvements by David Maurrasse

Journal of Higher Education, Outreach and Engagement, Volume 17(3) by a few AITF members in collaboration with others

Cooperating Across the Atlantic: Helping Realize Higher Education's Democratic Mission, by Sjur Bergan and Ira Harkavy

Anchor Institutions,  by U.S. Department of Housing and Development

Recent Speech by AITF Chair, Ira Harkavy

Democratic Devolution: How America's Colleges and Universities Can Strengthen Their Communities by Rita Axelroth Hodges and Ira Harkavy

The Road Half Traveled: University Engagement at a Crossroads, new book by Rita Axelroth Hodges and Steve Dubb

"What should Universities Do for Their Cities?" Zócalo Public Square, Responses by Nancy Cantor and Ira Harkavy among others

"It's Graduation Time-- So What Do We Want from Universities?" Huffington Post (May 26, 2011) by Nancy Cantor

The Promise and Prospects of Anchor Institutions: some thoughts on an emerging field" HUD  PD&R Edge (June 22, 2011) by Charles Rutheiser

Introductory Remarks at the  Reimagining Democratic Societies  Conference (June 27, 2011) by Ira Harkavy

Relevant Journal:

Journal of Higher Education Outreach and Engagement

Task Force Members on the Air:

Ted Howard's interview with America's Tomorrow

COIN

Civic Opportunity Initiative Network (COIN)

A network of young people, community based organizations (CBOs), institutions of higher education, and philanthropists dedicated to strengthening the education pipeline and promoting civic engagement. This is done through improving access to higher education, promoting civic engagement, strengthening community-based organizations and improving community resiliency. The hope is to create a new pipeline of well-educated local leaders to energize and sustain CBOs at the grassroots level through:
◦Enhanced learning, academic, and leadership capacity in individuals
◦The simultaneous identification and cultivation of young talent for self-development and community benefit

Goals:

  • Empower young leaders to strengthen ties to their communities
  • Integrate democratic participation into education
  • Create opportunities for academic and leadership training for young leaders
  • Link youth to grassroots community participation
  • Call communities into service via student civic engagement

The need for a network like COIN is clear. It develops clear pathways to higher education for low income students of color, engaged learning, reduced brain drain for communities and strengthened CBOs that serve these communities.
Froms its start, COIN is the only longstanding major national foundation grant making portfolio dedicating to promoting the engagement of anchor institutions in their surrounding communities.

 

How it Works          COIN Conceptual Framework          COIN Curriculum Components        

More Information

 


Initiatives

In addition to myriad projects, Marga also facilitates and advises ongoing intiatives.  The Race and Equity in Philanthropy Group, Civic Opportunities Initiative Network, and Anchor Institutions Task Force are examples of work that we facilitate.  Our website is just one point of communication with and for these efforts. 

The Marga Method

We have been developing and continually refining our methodology. Through this method, Marga plays the role of a partnership catalyst, providing a combination of consulting and research leading to partnerships that are sustained and continually producing results. The process is applicable to partnerships at the local level across all sectors of society such as business, government, nonprofits, the arts, higher education, philanthropy, health care and any other major industry. It is also applicable for partnerships within sectors and across national boundaries.

Marga's methodology is guided by the mutual interests that can be served through partnerships. In this approach, Marga helps partner institutions get beyond conflicts of interest to unearth shared goals and pursue common paths leading to measurable results. In providing the most valuable possible insights to clients, Marga takes the approach of a learning organization by continually writing and thinking about the nature of partnerships. In perpetually capturing lessons learned in the past and researching promising new practices, Marga can share its best thinking with clients and is able to make adjustments to the approach when necessary. Marga combines this knowledge development with the practical work of facilitation, strategic planning, and mediation that is required to maintain partnerships.

Publications

Available for purchase through Marga:

 

 

 

Your University & Your Community-14.95

 

 

Leadership and Personal Missions-19.95

 

 

Available for purchase on Amazon:

 

 

 

Listening to Harlem: Gentrification, Community and Business © 2006 Routledge

 

Beyond the Campus: How Colleges and Universities Form Partnerships with Their Communities ©  2001 Routledge

 

A Future for Everyone: Innovative Social Responsibility and Community Partnership © 2004 Routledge

 

 

 

Free:

                                                                                                                              

A Place at the Table (2004)

 Civic Opportunities Initiative Network: How It Works (2010)

 Civic Pathways out of Poverty and Into Opportunity (2010)

Financial Institutions in Community and Society (2005)

Landscape of Cross Sector Partnerships (2007)

Lessons Learned in Addressing Racial Equity (2009)

Profiles in Foundation Giving, Vol. 1 (2007)

Profiles in Foundation Giving, Vol. 2 (2008)

Real Partnerships (2007)

Race, Culture, Power, and Inclusion in Foundations (2005)

TARC Guide: Engaging Resources in Higher Education

2006 Worcester Speaker Series
 

 

Our Capabilities

Marga brings outside guidance to clients, enabling them to develop significant and lasting efforts that involve multiple stakeholders and intentionally employ new ways of navigating a complex array of circumstances within particular places and across borders. We provide the guidance, writing, strategic planning, facilitation, evaluation and research that enhance the effectiveness of these various approaches to addressing critical social concerns.  Our methodology is especially designed to enhance the quality and impact of strategic partnerships.  As a partnership catalyst, Marga has learned from experience and research what it takes to enhance the likelihood that collaborative pursuits, which bring stakeholders together from varied backgrounds around a common end, can most appropriately harness the wide range of resources different types of institutions can share in meeting some of today’s most pressing challenges.

Strategic Planning

Marga’s methodology is based on strategic planning, engaging a range of stakeholders around assets to build upon, obstacles to consider, opportunities to pursue, and threats to overcome.  We help initiatives craft appropriate missions and visions, identify competitive advantages, and develop realistic short and long term action plans.

Quantitative & Qualitative Research and Analysis

Whether initiatives are forming or seeking to improve, they require data to best inform increased effectiveness.  Marga is often called upon to provide research to strengthen client pursuits.  Marga is qualified to provide quantitative research, assessing existing data sets or developing new ones for regression or other forms of analysis.  Moreover, much of our work involves qualitative research, engaging in focus groups or interviews, developing case studies, and conducting content analyses.

Program Development

As many clients approach Marga seeking assistance with pursuing new ideas, we are often positioned to assist in creating new programs.  Marga’s strategic planning assistance aids the conception and design of new efforts.  Additionally, Marga assists in building new programs that move from planning to implementation.

Assessment and Evaluation

Marga conducts assessments and evaluations of all forms, both to develop new initiatives and to monitor the progress of existing efforts.  We develop theories of change, logic models, design metrics, conduct pre and post assessments, and engage in all aspects associated with creating indicators, guiding direction, and composing analysis, reflection, and recommendations.

Writing

Marga has developed numerous reports for clients.  In all of our substantive areas of work, we have published numerous books and articles based on Marga’s work.  Most research requested by our clients leads to some form of a report – some only for internal uses, and others for public consumption.  Our reports have been widely disseminated throughout philanthropic and various relevant fields.

Meeting Planning and Facilitation

Strategic planning requires meeting facilitation.  Overall, Marga’s work involves extensive meeting preparation, organizing travel, inviting participants, designing agendas, taking minutes, and beyond.  Marga has become known for facilitating learning exchanges that allow peers to simultaneously enhance knowledge and capacity.  We have facilitated large meetings that have formed innovative partnerships.

Speaking

Speaking engagements can provide unique short term opportunities to bring in the ideas of informed outsiders to stimulate internal dialogue or bring credibility to a particular point of view.  Marga’s speaking engagements have spanned the globe, allowing for presentations on learning from our work.  These engagements help inviting parties expand their breadth of understanding of strategy, partnerships, or any other ideas central to Marga’s work.  These engagements often catalyze new ideas and even new formations.

Resource Development

Marga’s breadth of relationships has enabled numerous opportunities to broker mutually beneficial partnerships.  Over the years, Marga’s ties to private philanthropic endeavors and other public and private actors has enabled introductions that have led to millions of dollars in investments.  Marga has leveraged funding for numerous partnerships and other initiatives throughout the United States.

The People of Marga

Marga Consultants:

Tesse Akpeki

Cheryl Blankenship

Faith Bynoe

Robert (Bob) Davidson

Darryl Peterkin

Judith Kallick Russell

Julie Tugend

Our History

Founded in 2000 in New York, NY


As Marga’s founder, David Maurrasse was leaving his positions as a Senior Program Advisor at the Rockefeller Foundation and as an Assistant Professor at Yale University, a new hybrid practitioner/scholar role was being developed in the summer of 2000.  Marga was founded on merging theory and practice and maintaining simultaneous ties in academia and in the wider universe of direct and active engagement.  As of July 1, 2000, Maurrasse’s new base became Columbia University, which included a faculty role at the School of International and Public Affairs and the development of the Center for Innovation in Social Responsibility (CISR).  In practice, Maurrasse became an independent consultant with the Rockefeller Foundation as the first official client.

CISR was designed to promote research and dialogue on trends in social responsibility and the various ways in which different institutions and industries engage in communities and address social issues.  Current Marga CEO, Cynthia Jones, was hired by as CISR’s first official Program Coordinator.  On the academic side, CISR hosted conferences and produced a book.  In the meantime, on the practitioner side, the sole proprietorship consulting operation became a company called, DJM & Associates.  It was renamed Marga Incorporated in 2002.

Marga began to build a diverse client base, including mostly foundations.  Eventually, this base broadened to include nonprofit organizations, government agencies, universities, and corporations.  Ultimately, Marga’s work included direct interventions in localities, facilitating the development of strategic multi-institutional partnerships.  We became known for our expertise around the role of institutions of higher education in communities, aided by the Routledge publication of Beyond the Campus: How Colleges and Universities Form Partnerships with their Communities (2001).  

MIssion & Rationale

"Marga" is a Sanskrit word; a path taken to arrive at a destination; it is an approach to a problem; with an implication of faith and dedication.


We are committed to these principles in client projects and internal practice.  This list of values includes features that capture the kind of thinking required to create and implement the pathways that will be required to solve today’s complex challenges and lead new and timely ideas and approaches.

A New York City – based global consulting firm, Marga Incorporated provides strategic advice and research to strengthen various pathways to improve society.  These pathways are manifested in a variety of ways, from philanthropic giving initiatives to creative partnerships that leverage the combined resources of the public and private and nonprofit sectors.  Marga’s clients have spanned a wide range of institutions, from well-established multibillion dollar foundations to grassroots community organizations to federal agencies to Fortune 500 companies and beyond. 

Marga is not merely a consulting firm bringing an outside point of view and a set of skills to its client projects.  Our mission is to strengthen ways in which resources are harnessed to improve communities and society. In our work, we strive to be:

• Innovative
• Strategic
• Creative
• Collaborative
• Visionary
• Influential
• Interdependent

 

 

Contact Marga Incorporated Consulting

Mailing Address:

Marga Incorporated
P.O. Box 4565
New York, NY 10163

Phone: 212-979-9770
Fax: 917-591-1547
Email: margainc@margainc.com

Office Hours:
Monday - Friday:
9:30 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. Eastern

Marga News

AITF
2013 Literature Review

The AITF has just finished their 2013 Anchor Institutions Literature Review, which assesses the growing body of research and writing on anchor institutions.

Read more…

Marga, Inc. | May 2013

REPG
Foundations Pursue Racial Equity in Policies and Practices

Learn more about the members in the Race & Equity in Philanthropy Group (REPG), which brings together foundations committed to improving their ability to effectively promote racial equity in their operations and practices.

Read more…

Marga, Inc. | May 2013

AITF
Reflections on The Netter Center Conference

The Netter Center's 20th Anniversary Conference was outstandingly impactful.  With over 500 participants, from 80 colleges and universities and 110 local, national and global organizations (including colleagues from across the United States and from Australia, Canada, Chile, France, Northern Ireland, Lebanon, and Spain), the conference educated participants on the work being done by anchors around the globe.  All in attendance maintained a high level of energy and intellectual curiosity, and the theme of anchors was carried strongly throughout both days.  The speakers and discussions were superb and have further ignited the higher education-community partnership movement.  We thank all AITF members who participated and played key roles throughout the conference.  

Marga, Inc. | November 2012

AITF
Final Anchor Institutions Forum Held in Philadelphia

The last meeting of the Anchor Institutions Task Force was held on December 15, 2011 in Philadelphia.  Thank you to all who attended and made the meeting a success.

Read more… 

Marga, Inc. | December 2011


COIN
Civic Opportunities Initiative Network

The Civic Opportunity Initiative Network has officially selected its final scholars. Click below to read about the program and its underlying framework.

Read more…


Marga, Inc. | December 2011

AITF
The Promise and Prospects of Anchor Institutions: some Thoughts on an Emerging Field

Charles Ruthesier, Senior Fellow at the Annie E. Casey Foundation, writes about the role “eds and meds” play in revitalizing urban and regional economics in the HUD PD&R Edge.

Read more…

Marga, Inc. | June 2011

MARGA
It's Graduation Time-- So What Do We Want from Universities?

Take a look at this insightful article published in the Huffington Post by Nancy Cantor, Chancellor and President of Syracuse University.

Read more…

Marga, Inc. | May 2011

 

Tweets by Margainc

Our Expertise & Impact

Marga brings outside guidance to clients, enabling them to develop significant and lasting efforts that involve multiple stakeholders and intentionally employ new ways of navigating a complex array of circumstances within particular places and across borders.

In viewing the state of affairs in the fields in which Marga has been working, our influence is quite apparent.  The attention to the role of universities and other anchor institutions in strengthening communities, the significance of school connections to higher education, and the increased attention to the role of diversity in philanthropy seem to have reached a tipping point of recognized importance for addressing a range of social concerns.

While the Marga Method has been at the heart of our work, some particular areas of emphasis and progress have emerged.  Our expertise is inclusive of many issues affecting community and and has been provided to communities across the Nation and the World. Our services have been provided to and on behalf of foundations, corporations, governments, universities, and many other entities.  Read more about some of the specific services we provide in our capabilities section. For publications, check out our publications section.

In viewing the state of affairs in the fields in which Marga has been working, our influence is quite apparent.  The attention to the role of universities and other anchor institutions in strengthening communities, the significance of school connections to higher education, and the increased attention to the role of diversity in philanthropy seem to have reached a tipping point of recognized importance for addressing a range of social concerns.

 

About Marga Incorporated Consulting

The funding, skills, and experiences required to significantly improve our world are segmented and/or not fully tapped. The vehicles through which resources are joined and applied toward critical societal concerns are varied, often embodied in philanthropic giving, voluntarism, and community relations initiatives. These approaches have built goodwill, and strengthened nongovernmental organizations that provide various services and initiatives. However, vast global inequities remain, and social challenges have become increasingly complex.

In the face of this complexity, ideas and approaches to philanthropy have become more strategic, placing greater emphasis on the actual changes resulting from funded efforts. Additionally, the roles and expectations of the corporate sector and various industries have expanded. Today, greater global impact requires a strategic combination of philanthropy and partnerships that includes the coordinated participation of government, foundations, corporations, universities, and any range of other institutions and industries.

A flattening, shrinking world has made interdependence a reality of the twenty first century. We see growing agreement that it takes a coordinated effort, involving multiple actors, to successfully address shared global concerns, such as poverty, disease, hunger, and climate change. For example, we know that, in any major city, wide networks – government, universities, corporations, hospitals, community-based organizations, and others – are required to forge a vibrant environment. As such, strong partnerships are necessary in order to effect significant positive change.

While our shared interests are evident, the instruments and vehicles needed to promote collaborative efforts are not well understood and, in many cases, have yet to be formed. Forging partnerships, much less sustaining them, remains difficult. Since we are all accustomed to working within our defined sectors and fields, we are not automatically capable of engaging in cross-sector partnerships. Despite the challenge, the beauty of partnerships is that once they are formed, they stand to produce continuously.

In the role of a partnership catalyst, Marga brings both expertise and an informed set of eyes to the task of seeding, growing, and nurturing partnerships and alliances that last. Marga provides guidance, strategic thinking, facilitation, research, coordination, and administration. Marga helps make the most of what we have for purposes greater than any one of us.

The resources required to make vast societal improvements are all around us. How to make those resources work together for the greater good is the most challenging piece of the puzzle. Marga helps its clients navigate this complex terrain and arrive at pathways sensible to all parties involved. By helping a wide variety of stakeholders – from foundations to businesses to nonprofits and universities – strengthen common bonds and shape mutually beneficial strategies in order to produce results, Marga is playing a central role in connecting pathways for the common good.

Marga Incoroporated Home

A New York City – based global consulting firm, Marga Incorporated provides strategic advice and research to strengthen various pathways to improve society.  These pathways are manifested in a variety of ways, from philanthropic giving initiatives to creative partnerships that leverage the combined resources of the public and private and nonprofit sectors.  Marga’s clients have spanned a wide range of institutions.

REPG

Race & Equity in Philanthropy Group

The REPG brings together foundations committed to improving their ability to effectively promote racial equity in their operations and practices.